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'Learning Without Limits'

Slideshow

Slideshow

RE

Religious Education at Leedon Lower School

 

Intent

 

The principal aim of Religious Education is to explore what people believe and what difference this makes to how they live, so that the pupils can gain the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to handle questions raised by religion and belief, reflecting on their own ideas and ways of living.

At Leedon Lower School, we believe Religious Education is vital in promoting the spiritual, moral, cultural and social development of pupils and that it prepares them for the opportunities, experiences and responsibilities of adult life. 

Our principles in the teaching of Religious Education are set out in our Religious Education and Collective Worship Policy, which can be found below.  Our intention is that the learning that the children experience reflect the religions and cultures of our local and the wider community and is respectful to those of all faiths, and of none.

 

Implementation

 

At Leedon Lower School, the children follow the Agreed Syllabus for Bedford Borough, Central Bedfordshire and Luton.  Our curriculum approaches religious education through a series of key questions:-

In Reception, the children will be taught from at least four of these units:

  • Why is the word ‘God’ so important to Christians?
  • Why is Christmas special for Christians?
  • Why is Easter special for Christians?
  • Being Special: Where do we belong?  (Learning from at least two religions).
  • Which places are specially valued and why?  (Learning from at least two religions).
  • Which stories are specially valued and why?  (Learning from at least two religions).

In Key Stages 1 and 2, the children will explore religions in more detail, using the following key questions as a guide.

 

Key Question

Religion(s) to be studied

Year 1

What do Christians believe God is like?

Christians

Year 1

Why does Christmas matter to Christians?  How and why do we celebrate special times?

Christians

Year 1

What makes some places significant?  What makes some places sacred to believers?

Christians, Muslim and/or Jewish people

Year 1

Why does Easter matter to Christians?

Christians

Year 1

Who us a Muslim?  What do they believe and how do they live?

Muslims

Year 2

How and why do we celebrate significant times?  What makes some celebrations sacred to believers?

Christians, Muslim and/or Jewish people

Year 2

What can we learn from sacred books and stories?

Christians, Muslim and/or Jewish people

Year 2

How do we show we care for others?  Why does it matter?

Christians, Muslim and/or Jewish people

Year 2

How do we show we care for the Earth?  Why does it matter?

Christians, Muslim and/or Jewish people

Year 2

Who is an inspiring person?  What stories inspire Christians, Muslim and/or Jewish people.

Christians, Muslim and/or Jewish people

Year 2

What is the ‘good news’ Christians believe Jesus brings?

Christians

Year 3

Where, how and why do people worship?

Christians, Muslim and/or Jewish people

Year 3

Why do some people think life is like a journey?  How and why do people mark significant events?

Christians, Hindus, Muslims and non-religious people

Year 3

What is the ‘Trinity’ and why is it important for Christians?

Christians

Year 3

What kind of World did Jesus want?

Christians

Year 3

Why do Christians call the day Jesus died ‘Good Friday’?

Christians

Year 3

How do festivals and family life show what matters to Jewish people?

Jewish people

Year 4

How is faith expressed in Hindu communities and traditions?

Hindus

Year 4

How is faith expressed in Sikh communities and traditions?

Sikhs

Year 4

How do festivals and worship show what matters to Muslims?

Muslims

Year 4

For Christians, what was the impact of Pentecost?

Christians

Year 4

What are the deeper meanings of the festivals?

Muslims, Jewish people, Hindus, Sikhs, non-religious celebrations

Year 4

How and why do people try to make the world a better place?

Christians, Muslims, Sikhs, non-religious people


RE is taught discretely, with teachers planning the lessons taking account of the key learning objectives which are identified and set out in the unit Assessment sheets created by the school.  Additional areas of challenge have been identified by the RE co-ordinator for each unit of work, and teachers’ planning will include opportunities for more able children to meet these additional objectives.

The school has a number of artefacts to stimulate discussion in RE, and teachers are encouraged to use these whenever appropriate.

Teachers and children are reminded of the importance of showing respect for the beliefs of others, and all artefacts that are handled are done so on this basis.

Teachers are encouraged to focus on discussion, understanding and reflection in their planning of RE.

Teachers will endeavour to use and model the correct vocabulary at all times.  Where names of individuals or places are to be used, teachers and children will, where possible, use the correct spellings and pronunciation of these according to the religion/culture being discussed.

Teachers are encouraged to plan RE lessons so that the children’s existing literacy skills do not provide a barrier to their accessing the RE curriculum.

The school has a library of books to enable teachers to develop their own curriculum knowledge, particularly around subjects or religions that they may have not taught before.  In addition, further CPD can and will be provided where a need is recognised by the RE Co-Ordinator or Senior Leadership Team.

 

Impact

 

Lessons are engaging and encourage children to reflect.

Teachers are confident in delivering RE teaching in all areas.

Teachers are aware of how what they teach is supported by what children have learnt previously, and of how their teaching supports children to learn in subsequent years.

Children are willing and able to talk about religious and moral ideas: they can talk about what others believe and about their own feelings and beliefs.

Children make connections between different areas of learning in RE, and between their RE learning and their learning in other areas of the curriculum.

 

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